Completed set & master set – one last look at 1986 Topps

3 03 2011

Since I have now completed the 1986 Topps and Traded set (my first year completed!), I wanted to do a “look back” at the set.  I’ll do this for each set as I complete a set, and each time I complete a “master set” – which I’m defining as the set and the insert sets I’m collecting from that set.  For any readers out there – if there’s any other information regarding these sets that you’d like to include – feel free to comment and let me know. I’ll be happy to add it – I’d like these pages to be a good place to come back to see random information about these sets.

Info about my set:

How I put the set together:

  • 385 cards from the wax box
  • 12 cards from a rack pack
  • 380 cards I already had from back in the day
  • 15 cards from trades

Card that completed my set: #500 – Rickey Henderson (1 of 5 cards I got in a trade that completed the set)

General set info:

Set composition: 792 cards (694 individual player cards, 26 Managers, 5 Turn Back the Clock, 6 Pete Rose Tributes, 6 Checklists, 7 Record Breakers, 22 All-Stars, 26 Team Leaders)

Representation of ’85 MLB season: Out of the 694 player cards, 2 players (Brent Gaff and Charlie Lea) were injured and didn’t play in 1985.  The 692 players represent 73.4% out of the ~943 players who played in MLB in 1985.

Last active player from this set: #391 – Julio Franco, #661 – Roger Clemens

Both players played until 2007; Franco’s last regular season game was 9/17/07, while Clemens last was 9/16/07 (regular season) and 10/7/07 (post-season)

Player with the most cards in the set: Pete Rose – 9 cards

#1, #2-#7 (The Pete Rose Years), #206 (Record Breaker), #741 MGR

First Card and the Hundreds: #1 – Pete Rose, #100 – Nolan Ryan, #200 – Mike Schmidt, #300 – George Foster, #400 – Rod Carew, #500 – Rickey Henderson, #600 – Dale Murphy, #700 – Reggie Jackson

Highest book value: #661 – Clemens

Most notable card: #1 – Rose

I’m going with this card – they based the marketing of the set around his breaking the hit record

Best card (my opinion): #200 – Schmidt

Great photo of a great player, looks like he just went yard

Second best card (also my opinion): see the subset card below…

Best subset card: #206 – Pete Rose RB

Commemorates his passing Ty Cobb for the all-time hit record

Favorite action photo: #616 – Glenn Brummer, #639 – Bo Diaz

I went with a tie here – both are great “play at the plate” shots

Favorite non-action photo: #29 – Tony Phillips

Had this photo been in, say, 2006, do you think everything in this picture would have been destined to be cut up and fitted into various baseball cards to be packed out in?  You’ve got a game-used: hat, jersey, fielding glove, ball, batting glove, and a bat.

My Favorite Reds card: #85 – Tony Perez

Veteran Perez giving young Eric Davis high-five after scoring

2010 & 2011 Topps Reprints and others:

  • 1999 Ryan reprints – Nolan Ryan
  • 2001 Through the Years – Robin Yount
  • 2001 Archives – Rod Carew, Tony Perez, Rollie Fingers, George Foster, Al Oliver, Tony Perez RB
  • 2001 Topps Traded – Barry Bonds (’86T), Bobby Bonilla (’86T), Jose Canseco (’86T), Will Clark (’86T), Andres Galarraga (’86T), Bo Jackson (’86T), Wally Joyner (’86T)
  • 2002 Archives – Mike Scott, Joe Carter, Fernando Valenzuela, Bob Ojeda, Dave Johnson MG
  • 2003 Gallery Heritage – Canseco (’86T)
  • 2005 Rookie Cup Reprints – Ozzie Guillen, Vince Coleman, Roger McDowell
  • 2010 CYMTO – Tony Gwynn, Mike Schmidt, Paul Molitor
  • 2011 60YoT – Dave Winfield, Don Mattingly
  • 2012 Archives – Darryl Strawberry

The Canseco rookie from Traded is the only with 2 reprints thus far.

Other Notable Cards: #201 – Vince Coleman RB, #202 – Dwight Gooden RB

Though not as big as Rose passing Cobb, these cards commemorate significant accomplishments by these young stars


My Master” Set Info:

1,006 cards – 792 “base”, 132 “update”, 82 “insert”

  • Update set: Traded
  • Insert sets: Glossy All-Star Game Commemorative, Glossy All-Star and Hot Prospects (send-in)

How I put the other sets together: I purchased them all as sets from various online sources

Update set composition: 132 cards (123 players, 8 Managers, 1 checklist)

In the update set not in the base set: 64 players, 6 managers

Total in base and update sets: 758 players, 32 managers, 3 retired players

Highest book value in the update set: #11T – Barry Bonds

Most notable card from the Update set: #11T – Barry Bonds, #20T – Jose Canseco

I went with a tie here – Canseco was the most notorious at the time of release and shortly thereafter, but Bonds would prove to be the most significant over time.  Bo Jackson’s XRC was ranked card #8 out of Topps “vote 60”, but I’d put either of these cards ahead.

Most notable insert card: There isn’t one worth mentioning.

Best Insert card: Glossy All-Star and Hot Prospects #17 – Mike Schmidt

Another card where Schmidt is watching what might be a home run – looks like he’s trying to will this one fair

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7 responses

4 03 2011
JT

Congrats on completing the set…BUT did you REALLY complete it?

What about these cards?

http://fleersticker.blogspot.com/2010/06/1986-topps-box-bottom-cards-panels.html

You know it’s not REALLY complete until you have it ALL! 🙂

4 03 2011
Jonathan @ RGB Cards

I like the way you broke the set down and the categories you used to do it.

27 03 2011
1986 TOPPS PETE ROSE #1 | Pete Rose Fan Shop

[…] Completed set – one last look at 1986 Topps « Lifetime Topps project […]

5 04 2012
Anonymous

i have all the same cards. great collection. gd hobby!

5 04 2012
chuckneo

Thanks!

14 11 2012
gjarok

1986 was the first year I started collecting. It’s funny to think of a time when Jim Pankovits (or something approximating that) meant the same as Nolan Ryan – they were both big, block letter ASTROS. This is a great summary of everything. I look forward to engaging in some of the other sets. By the way, did anyone ever actually win that trip to spring training. Ah, life before real inserts. Those were the days.

14 11 2012
chuckneo

No clue – funny how in the days before the internet you’d never know something like that. Now a contest winner like that would definitely go on the company’s website!

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